Posts Tagged thought leadership

Train horns and social business

Posted by on Wednesday, 20 November, 2013

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There are train tracks a few miles from my house. On most days I forget they are there, as they’re far enough away that I don’t see them daily, and rarely get stuck at a crossing. I do, however, occasionally hear the horn. When the conditions are just right I will hear the blast of the horn come through the trees, over the hills and across the tops of the houses into my office as I’m working in the early mornings. Rarely do I hear it when the fog is in, or even when there is cloud cover, but on the few clear mornings, the sound of that horn bounces through the atmosphere and reminds me of the tracks three miles away.

Success in social business is much like that train horn: conditions need to be right in order to be heard. Luckily, we can control some of those conditions more easily than we can change the weather. In order to get your voice through the filters and noise of the social internet there are a few things you can do to tip the conditions to your favour, much like the clear skies helping the train horn carry miles across the valley:

  • Get the lay of the land; learn the valleys and peaks. Watch and see how everyone interacts to determine the etiquette in the space.
  • Start small by just adding people you know to your networks.
  • Don’t be a tourist for too long. Watch and listen, but begin sharing things you find interesting.
  • Begin curating your networks to include people who share things relevant to your interests or business.
  • Continue sharing things you find and start adding in your own expertise and ideas.
  • Engage in conversation with your network to build deeper relationships.
  • Continue curating your networks by adding your target audience. By this point you should have an established presence that will help show value to anyone who may look to follow you.
  • Be active, slightly provocative, and consistent in your voice.

Now, when you sound your horn, the message will fly further than you may have ever expected. You’ve taken the right steps to tweak the conditions to your favour and build the atmosphere to support not only visibility of your message, but hopefully others sharing it as well with their own curated networks to amplify far beyond the rail crossing of you and your immediate followers.

Our complex social connections

Posted by on Wednesday, 6 November, 2013

IMG_1816Recently, as happens when politics become a hot topic in the social spaces, a dear and close friend was struggling with some questions around unfriending and social media: wondering out loud why expression of opinion would lead to unfriending, and if so then why was the person on their friends list in the first place.  What a simple question that has a long and complex answer, if any answer at all. I’d like to try to tackle this from a high level, conceptual view and hopefully translate that into something usable….

You may have noticed that when I am blogging about work related items, I primarily use the phrase “social business”, but when talking about the tools or channels used I say “social media”. I don’t use the two phrases interchangeably, because they have very different implications, some of which are germane to this post: specifically that it shows a basis of intent. Social business as a phrase implies how we go about utilizing the social media tools to further our business goals or solve business problems. Social media, on the other hand, is the venue in which we apply our social business actions. Note, that neither of these two phrases have I implied any human connection.

That human connection is where things get fuzzy, fast. Not because it doesn’t exist in social business, but rather because it does. Human interaction throughout our social media channels comes with deep complexities because we all use these channels for differing purposes. I don’t mean wide-breadth differences either, I mean those subtle differences that are nearly imperceptible. THOSE are the bits that get fuzzy and sticky and cause discomfort at times. Some people use social media to keep in contact with only family, some with friends and family, others go wider and include co-workers, and even wider yet some will add just about anyone to their networks. Our individual criteria for who we add to any given network changes fluidly between persons and channels causing the complexity of existing criteria to grow exponentially. This difference in criteria undermines some of the basic social contracts we all agree to when adding someone to our networks: we sub-consciously assume the same criteria was used by both parties when that is likely never the case. Add on to this complexity of criteria the differences between face to face interactions and online social interaction, and the differences between people are multiplied yet again. All of this is rolled up into a single word: friends, a word which contains subtle complexities of such a wide berth that the word itself means different things for every person who uses it.

There is also a safety of false anonymity provided by our computer screens and text bases communication, just as there is also a false intimacy that plays counterpoint. Both of which vary slightly (or at times greatly) from connection to connection. Just like in real life, every relationship is different. Social media channels, however, amplify and extend these differences and provide deeper visibility beyond what real life interactions would normally show. Physical life is far more transitory in visible interactions, whereas social media posts and comments have a far longer shelf life and greater visibility. Many things we learn about each other online would never come to light in our face to face interactions. This is becoming more problematic as we see these interactions conflicting with our assumptions of intimacy and connections both online and off. This seems to be especially true during election cycles and immediately following human induced tragedies.

Today we are in a paradigm shift of information; the ramifications of which touch every part of our lives regardless of where we consume that information. And therein lies another cultural shift we are encountering: Online and in face interactions are more commonly coming into conflict based on amounts of information available. Our old concepts and definitions of friends are being quickly outdated by virtue of access to information combined with our own ideological views and our abilities to reconcile the two when they disagree. This demands a deeper level of critical thinking in a world which is becoming more polarized as these views are stated in sound bites and reactionary fashions.

While all relationships are fluid and in constant change, social media has added a passive permanence which has never existed in society previously. Prior to internet interactions and friending/following, relationships that weren’t nurtured and actively maintained would wither and fade, commonly called “losing touch” or “drifting apart”. Now, however, the passiveness of relationship maintenance on-line has given an unprecedented and over-inflated sense of deeper or sustained relationships when those same persons offline wouldn’t necessarily ever be in contact again. This is also a wonderful part of social media tools in that we are able to maintain more relationships at longer distances and intervals of direct communication, but we need to recognize that the social contracts are different; friends on Facebook or followers on Twitter don’t equate to offline friends in an assumed way. GooglePlus has tried to capture the complexities of relationships in this manner with their implementation of Circles to categorize the people in your network and tailor your content shares to only specific circles, but G+ also still misses the fluidity of relationships and how people can easily and quickly shift from one level of intimacy to another. The manual curation for those shifts falls to the user, and no one has time for that level of manual maintenance, even assuming they have the focus and ability to accurately identify exactly when and how those shifts occur.

With this ever-changing landscape of shared information and passive-permanent connections making it easier for us all to become and remain connected to larger networks of people than ever in history, it is even more critical to maintain a thoughtful focus in our interactions. The polarization of dogmas and ideologies means we need to make the extra effort to think critically about what we say online along with how we say it, as the ramifications of what once would have been off-handed remarks to a single friend can now have a much more broad reach and impact than our experiences have taught us up to now. Adding intent to our interactions, not just reactive response will help us all navigate the shifting currents and tides of social engagement.

 

Improve your personal digital eminence by adding value

Posted by on Monday, 15 April, 2013

IMG_0962I’ve written on this topic before and in multiple spaces. I first touched on the idea back in January 2011 with this post over on the Notes from Rational Support blog: On Personal Digital Eminence. In that post I set for a simple call to action for “both IBMers and the public alike: Get out there and distinguish yourself in your space”. Many of you heeded that call, saw the value, and have begun sharing more in the social spaces and really building your own eminence, even taking the more specific actions of claiming your own name space to improve your digital eminence!

Today, rather than selling you on the value of creating your online eminence and thought leadership, I want to talk to you about a single small refinement that has the largest impact when sharing online.

One of the key items in the IBM Social Computing Guidelines is the idea of “adding value”. This means asking yourself before posting if this is going to add any value to the conversation, or if it will add value by creating a conversation worth having. Now, I think most of us can rationalize some sort of value into nearly everything we post today, so I’d like to touch on how to improve this notion of “value add”.

The single most effective and easiest way to add value is to provide some sort of context or commentary when sharing any link. Have you see people share only a link with no other text around it? How often have you clicked on those links? I’m willing to say rarely to never. You may also be thinking that most of what you reshare from others is self-explanatory; and in many cases it quite well could be. But, unless it is an eCard meme, I’m guessing there’s value you can add to anything you share or reshare… especially if you are sharing in a more professional context. Let’s take the following example which shows how I added value to a share that was already potentially self-explanatory:

In the example below, Susan shared Robert’s post on G+. Since I don’t follow Robert, Susan’s share gave me immediate value as the content was interesting to me… but when it comes to resharing, how could I add even more value to Robert’s post and Susan’s share? Simple: I added my own perspective as to why this post has value for me:

gplus_context_share    .

Adding your own insights or context does a few things to add value here: One, it provides a reason for your audience to pay attention and click-through to the link or content you found interesting enough to share. Two, it begins to build up your own digital eminence as people begin to understand your views and insights on what interests you. And as a third tangential benefit, adding context and commentary like this surfaces you in Google search results lending even more weight to your personal digital eminence.

Don’t believe me? Need a real world example? Try Google searching on the phrase “digital eminence” and you’ll find that my content is not only one of the top 3 results, but two of the highlighted images are also from my own posts. Results which have come directly from adding value when sharing these posts from myself or by others.

If you want those same kind of results (or better) for yourself start adding your own commentary and context to the content you share. Soon, you’ll find your own name popping up in search results like this too! It really is the single easiest and best way to build your own digital eminence around the topics which interest you… you’ll thank me when a hiring manager does some quick searches and hires you into that new role because YOU show up in the results.