My top performing posts in 2013

This entry was posted by on Thursday, 5 December, 2013 at

waywardcelttop_spots .

Coming up on the end of the year I’ve started reviewing my business results and impact to submit for my day job. Since so much of my work overlaps with my blog posts and activities in the social spaces I figured I could look into the results I’ve seen from blogging this past year and perhaps find a bit of business intelligence from some basic analysis. Just taking a brief look over some of the data, I think I’ve found some great takeaways gleaned from some additional back-end metrics as well…

To that end,  here’s a quick recap of my top 10 most viewed posts in 2013 (note that not all of them were actually published in 2013, but rather just the most viewed this year):

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The etiquette of retweet requests (how to improve your reach)

Finding a Facebook page’s RSS feed

The fear of saying the wrong thing

YouTube and RSS: Building a feed link

Best Practices

2013: The Year of Influence

Blogging 101 for Subject Matter Experts

A discussion on barriers to social participation

Improve your personal digital eminence by adding value

Do influencers deserve to be paid?

 

So, what are some of my takeaways from this data?

  • Firstly, I can surmise from the top post that people are still focused on retweet numbers to drive ‘reach’ and are looking for ways to ask others to help them. By reach, I really just mean visibility and basic potential for engagement. From my bounce rate metrics on that post I can also surmise that most people didn’t find what they were looking for (ie. an easy answer to improving reach).
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  • Secondly, I have consistently seen my YouTube RSS and Facebook RSS feed posts performing well week over week. This tells me I should likely look at more technically focused posts to balance my concept and theory posts around social business. Striking a balance with logistics and thought leadership.
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  • Of course, some of those conceptual posts also seem to be doing relatively well. The ones which really took off look to be around getting started and how-to, with one outlier (“Do influencers deserve to be paid”) which performed well as a result of connecting the content with a related article and engaging with that article’s author. A good lesson to be learned in that one: networking with other authors and driving conversations around topics which they are passionate about will improve the performance of your own related posts.
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Next week I plan to take a look at my UNDER performing posts and highlight some potentially valuable content which you likely have missed.

 

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